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Solid Brass Ship Wheel Compass 18
brass compass
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Solid Brass Ship Wheel Compass 18"

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Overall Dims: 18"
SKU#: BR4832

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brass compass
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Dimensions: 18"

Solid Brass Ship Wheel Compass 18"

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Standing tall and guiding the way, this combination ship’s helm wheel and compass both point out your course and steer you upon it. Finely-crafted from highly-polished solid brass, this ship wheel and compass combination is a marvelous nautical décor accessory that immediately sets the theme of the room when placed upon any shelf or desk. It is ideal as a living room or office highlight, or an inspirational piece in a business meeting room. 


  • Solid brass helm, wheel and compass body
  • Fully functional compass mounted atop helm
  • Compass lift-arm protects needle bearing
  • Solid wood base elegantly compliments brass housing
  • Felt-lined footing protects furniture surfaces

Similar to Brass Desk Compasses Models

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With the amazing history of both the ship’s wheel and the compass, this antique compass for sale truly delves into the depths of nautical lore. By the beginning of the 13th century the European dry compass was created, and by the second half of the century the antique compass was used throughout Europe and the Mediterranean, leading to a dramatic increase in trade. A key to the creation of the first Portolan Charts, maps with realistic depictions of European coastlines, the antique marine compass helped usher in the Age of Discovery. Following the dispersion of the antique compass throughout Europe, and combined with these charts and advances in shipbuilding, from the early 15th century through the 17th century European powers expanded across the globe. Following the amazing impact of the antique compass, the early 18th century saw the ship’s wheel transform sailing. Before the wheel, whipstaffs and tillers were used to manipulate the rudder in a somewhat counterintuitive manner. The earliest known ship’s wheel, circa 1700, England, represented a new chapter in sailing as it was designed to turn the rudder in the same direction as the wheel. Unlike the whipstaff or tiller, turning the wheel to starboard resulted in the ship’s bow pointing to starboard. The ship’s wheel was a true revolution for the world; the engineering behind it not only helped usher in the Age of Enlightenment and the discovery of the world by sea, but with modern adaptations it remains a fixture aboard the most amazing cruise ships the world has ever seen, as well as becoming a standard fixture you see in any automobile.